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April 29, 2005

Pack It Away!

One of my favorite highlights of Bishop Mule Days is getting to see the pack teams in action.

There is nothing quite like a well-trained team of pack mules under the guidance of several experienced packers. It is just awesome to watch them all work together as a team!

Here are some pictures of several of my favorite packing events at Bishop Mule Days. The first picture is from the Pack Scramble. The team with the blue shirts is K-Bar-K from Raymond, CA. They are some really good packers, and usually place near the top every year.

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This next picture is from the Sunday evening Pack Off for World Champion Pack Team. All those items you see set around the arena are things that the packers will have to load on their mules and tie down well enough that they won't come off when the mules go around the back track - quite a challenge sometimes!

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And here is another photo I like. This beautiful pack team participated in the opening of the Sunday evening show last year.

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We hope you can come join us in enjoying more great packing events like these at Bishop Mule Days 2005 on May 24-29!

Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 10:53 PM | Comments (0)

April 28, 2005

Treat of the Week - Breakfast Boats

It's been raining so much here lately, I think if the rain doesn't stop soon, we may just float away!

So here's a treat to go along with this April Showers theme!

Breakfast Boats

1/3 Cup Quick Oats
2/3 Cup Water
Apples
Strawberries
Fresh Pears

Mix the quick oats and water in a microwaveable bowl, and microwave on high for 2 minutes. Chop fresh pears, apples and strawberries, and mix with cooked oat. If desired, you may add salt to taste. Set oat mixture aside to cool. While waiting, Slice several apples in quarters and cut out their cores. Once the oatmeal has cooled, drop spoonfuls of the oatmeal mix on top of the cored Apple quarters making apple fruit boats.

Make sure the oatmeal and fruit has cooled enough before serving. Enjoy your boats in this wet rainy weather, but don't float to far away!

Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com

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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 10:28 PM | Comments (0)

April 27, 2005

Clean Pastures and Sweet Melons

Have you ever been overwhelmed by the amount of manure your donkeys and mules can produce?

I know it seems like I no more than turn my back, and my donkeys have created quite a collection at their favorite dumping grounds! Fortunately my donkeys have picked special spots to leave their manure, instead of leaving it all over the field, but it can get kind of messy in those areas. I know after a long winter, no matter how hard I work to keep it clean, it seems like the area in front of my barn always ends up with a nice collection of manure.

My solution? We have a building equipment rental business down at the end of our street that has some lovely landscaping equipment. Usually ever spring I rent one of their Bobcats or similar scoopers, and scrape up all the manure piles and collection areas around my paddocks and barn.

That is just what we did this last weekend. We also moved some dirt to help the muddy areas in my donkeys' pens drain better, too. Here is the "super pooper scooper" that we used this year. It is make this so much easier than moving all the manure and dirt by hand, and we can just drive it wherever we want to leave the dirt and manure, and dump it there. Here is the little scooper we rented this year. It is smaller than a standard Bobcat, and was only about 4 feet wide. That made it easier to manuver in tight places. But you do have to be careful about lifting heavy loads of dirt up high with it - it isn't well balanced for that. But it does an excellent job of scraping up manure piles.

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By the way, I learned a few years ago that old donkey manure piles make an excellent place to grow watermelons! I had a big pile of manure that I had dumped in one corner of our garden a few winters ago. The next spring we must have dumped some watermelon rinds and food garbage out there to turn into compost. One of the watermelon seeds decided to sprout, and grew hidden in the weeds around the manure pile. That fall when we were cleaning up our garden, we found a huge watermelon growing on that vine! Here in Utah the growing season is short enough that we only usually get tiny Sugar Baby type watermelons to grow in our gardens - if we're lucky. But this watermelon was as big as the giant watermelons you can get at the grocery store, and it was really sweet and perfectly ripe too! I haven't gotten around to planting any more watermelon seeds in that area yet, but I want to do it again sometime.

Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com

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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 10:38 PM | Comments (0)

April 26, 2005

Donkey Clipping Photos

As I promised, here are pictures of the first steps to clipping your donkey. These pictures go along with the steps described in my article "Clipping Your Donkey for Show - Part 4". Please refer back to that article for a detailed description of the steps.

While the clippers are running, I rub the clipper handle back and forth on my donkey's shoulder and back to get him accustom to the feel of the vibrating motor.

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Then I start clipping right above the tail, moving against the direction that the hair lies.

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I let the clippers glide through the fur slowly, flipping away the excess cut hair with a flip of my wrist.

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Then I continue my first path partway up my donkey's back.

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Once I have the first path started, I go back to working across the hip - always clipping against the direction that the hair grows.

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As you can see, even though I tried to keep Andy clean, and brushed him good before I started clipping, there is still a lot of dust hidden down deep in his fur. It is ideal to give your donkey a bath and tie him up to dry (but still stay clean), before you clip him. This will make your clipping job go faster, and will help your blades stay sharp longer. But the weather here was too cold to give baths today, and I really needed to get Andy clipped.

You may notice in several of the pictures that Andy is missing patches of hair in different places along his neck and sides. Somehow this time of year one or more of my donkeys must get extra rambunctious, and pull mouthfuls of hair out of the others during their play games. I have tried hard to keep Andy away from the jennet that I think is doing it, until I had a chance to clip his fur shorter. But somehow she got to him this last weekend (maybe through the fence) and pulled out a few mouthfuls of his fur. So I had no choice but to clip him before she totally ruined his coat.

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Andy did pretty good standing still while I clipped his first side, but I had to call in my helpers to feed him grass and treats while I finished clipping his other side. He was getting bored.

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Here is what Andy's coat looked like after I had finished the first side of his body and neck. I left his tummy for later because it was kind of dirty. And I'll do his head, legs, mane and tail later. Don't you love that shine to his coat, even though it is still a bit dusty?

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Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 10:54 PM | Comments (0)

April 25, 2005

Clipping Your Donkey for Show - Part 5

If you followed the steps in my last article in this series, your donkey should be clipped pretty nicely on his body, tummy and neck (but not mane), and you should be ready to proceed on to some of the trickier areas.

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The next part I like to do is my donkey's legs. Some donkeys are more sensitive about having their legs clipped than others. You will want to pay attention to your donkey's reaction and clip accordingly. You can start by clipping up your donkey's front legs from just above his knees up to his shoulder (or wherever you have already clipped). If your donkey will allow you to clip his lower front legs, you may find it easier to start down near the top of the hoof, and work your way all the way up his leg instead of doing it in two steps. Usually my donkeys are a little more sensitive around their knees, and I just have to take it slow over that area. Once my donkey's front legs are clipped all the way around, I pick up their foot, so that I can clip around their ankle better, and smooth things out there. Repeat this process with the other front foot.

Then you can go to clipping your donkey's back legs. Be sure to stand in a safe place incase your donkey gets nervous and kicks. I like to start right above the donkey's hock, and clip a track straight up the back of his leg to his hip. Then I clip tracks along side that one, working my way around the leg - clipping the whole outside hip and leg above the hock. Then carefully clip the inside back of the leg working your way around to your donkey's tail (hold his tail out of the way, so you don't clip it, too).

If your donkey is still standing nicely, and will allow you to clip his lower back legs, you can continue on to that step. One of my donkeys is a little more sensitive on his legs, and prefers that I not clip his lower back legs. His lower legs are not too hairy, so I usually just taper the hair length off so that it gradually transitions from unclipped to clipped and doesn't look uneven.

If your donkey will allow you to clip his back legs, here are the steps I would use. I am right handed, and like to rest my left hand on my donkey's hock. I stand in close to my donkey's side, and press down gently on his hock. This makes it harder for him to kick me without me having time to react and stay out of harms way. While my left hand is resting on top of his hock, I clip his lower back legs. Start with a path from his hoof, up the center front of his back leg. Then clip tracks next to both sides of that one working your way around the leg. Carefully clip around his ankles. Now his back legs should be about done!

Next time we'll talk about clipping your donkey's mane and tail.


Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 10:01 PM | Comments (0)

April 22, 2005

Saddle Ties

If you have a horse trailer with a saddle rack in it, you may have noticed that you need to tie down your saddles so that they don't shift around or slide off while you are driving.

When I bought my horse trailer, I found a little sticker inside the door that says you must tie down all saddles on the saddle rack. You might think that the weight of the saddle will hold it in place, but even when I drive carefully and turn gently to give my donkeys a smoother ride, it seems like every so often I still have a saddle that slides off if I don't tie them down.

For a long time I wondered what I could use to tie them down and hold them in place. Then I came up with a bright idea. You might like to try it, too, if your saddle rack is designed to work like mine.

I measured and bought two bungee straps for each saddle position on the rack. I bought the black rubber kind instead of the rope type of bungee because I think it doesn't stretch as easily, and is more likely to hold the saddle down better.

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Before I go driving somewhere with my trailer, I place the saddles on the saddle rack. If they are nice saddles I may cover them with a cloth to protect their finish. Then I pull a bungee cord across both sides, and hook them down. The bungee cords are easy to hook up and undo, and so far they have done a great job of holding my saddles in place while I'm driving down the road.

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Warning: I don't recommend using bungee cords in areas around donkeys, mules, horses or other livestock. If they put extra strain on the bungee cords, the bungees can come flying apart pretty quickly, and can cause some disastrous results. My saddle rack is way back inside my dressing room, and no where near where the donkeys can reach it. There is also not a lot of pressure on the bungee cords - just enough to hold the saddles in place. So I feel pretty safe with this arrangement.

The black rubber bungees also seem like they might be less likely to come apart as they attach with a hook that hooks through a hole in the black rubber instead of a wire wrapped around the end of the bungee cord, although if put under enough pressure, I'm sure the metal hook would bend too. Just use them wisely.

Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 06:49 AM | Comments (0)

April 21, 2005

Treat of the Week - Longears Trail Mix

When you go trail riding, I imagine you like to take some snacks along to enjoy later. Here is a dry snack you can take for your equine buddy.

Longears Trail Mix

You will need several of your critter's favorite fruits and veggies. You might try apples, carrots, oranges, melon or pear. Slice the fruits in slices about 1/4 inch thick. Then place them in a food dehydrator until they have turned into nice chewy dried fruit. Mix several fruits together to create your own flavor mix. You can also add a small amount of whole oats to your Longears Trail Mix.

Next time when you pack your saddlebags for another deep woods adventure, don't forget to put in a baggie of your Longears Trail Mix, as well as a snack for yourself! Your donkey or mule will be grateful for a small well-deserved treat at the end of a long ride. Just feed him a small amount at a time and remember what is appropriate for his individual diet.

My fruits and veggies aren't dry yet, but I'll get a picture of them for you in a few days when they are done!

Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 10:46 PM | Comments (0)

April 20, 2005

Trick Question

How many two-mule teams hitched to their wagons can you fit in the Bishop Mule Days arena at one time?

In 2003 we had the awesome experience of seeing a large number of two-up teams participating together in the 2 Mule Hitch Class. There were a total of 26 teams entered in this class, so the Mule Days staff had to divide them up into 3 sections. Before the final judging, they brought all the 2 mule teams back into the arena to line up for the audience.

I think there were a few teams that had decided to scratch that class, but with all the teams that were left, they filled the arena when they were lined up side by side.

Here are 14 of the teams. What a lot of mule power!

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Here is another picture of some of the teams driving around the arena while others waited in the middle.

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And here is one of my favorites! The owners of this team camped right across from us during Mule Days. They were from Copper Windmill Ranch. I was really fascinated by this wagon that they brought. I believe they said it is a replica of a 100-year-old wagon. It has so many handy compartments for storing things. I can see how something like this would have been very nice for people traveling or moving long distances by wagon. They won 1st place for their wagon entry in the Bishop Mule Days parade, too.

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This year Bishop Mule Days is offering quite a few different driving classes. They are:

Tuesday Morning Show:
Donkey Gambler's Choice - Single Donkey
Gambler's Choice - Single Mule
Timed Obstacles - Single Mule

Tuesday Afternoon Show:
Donkey Pleasure Driving - Working - Single Donkey
Pleasure Driving - Working - Single Mule
Ride & Drive - Pleasure Type
2 Mule Hitch Class

Thursday Morning Show:
4 Mule Hitch Class
6 Mule Hitch Class

Friday Morning Show:
Farm Class
Gambler's Choice - Teams

Friday Evening Show:
Americana Class
Gambler's Choice - Single Mule

Come join us in enjoying these great events!

Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 09:42 PM | Comments (0)

April 19, 2005

Rain, Rain, Go Away! Come Again Some Other Day!

Are you as eager to get into spring training and condition with your critters as I am with mine?

Somehow the weather just doesn't seem to be cooperating. Here in Utah we usually have nice dry sunny weather. But lately it has been raining quite a bit. We had about two weeks of rain, then it dried up and got nice. I was able to fit some training lessons in while the weather was nice. Then the last couple days it has been raining again!

I'm sure the rain will be really good for the plants, but it makes it a little hard for me to do donkey training in my outdoor training areas! I think my donkeys would also like it to dry out a little so they can come out of the barn without getting their feet wet.

When I went out to check on them this afternoon, all the donkeys were standing under the barn roof where they could stay dry.

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Here is what my training pen area looked like. I'm sure the water will dry out pretty fast once the rain goes away and the sun comes out, but right now there are puddles everywhere.

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So my donkeys got out of school for one day!


Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 10:08 PM | Comments (0)

April 18, 2005

Clipping Your Donkey for Show - Part 4

By now your donkey should be accepting you walking up to him and petting him while you are holding the clippers in the other hand. Now it is time to move on to the next step.

KristieJorgensen.jpgWhile the clippers are still running, turn them around so that the clipping edge of the blade is facing you, and rub the back of the clipper across your donkey's shoulder. This will help him become accustom to the vibrations before you actually start clipping. Rub him all over his shoulders, neck, and down his back with the back of the clipper handle. He should remain pretty calm while you are doing this. If at anytime he gets nervous and uneasy, back up to something that he is comfortable with. Maybe if there is one area he will let you rub the clippers, but he starts getting upset when you move it to another, go back to the first place, and let him relax and praise him before trying the touchy spot again.

Once I have completed this step, I am ready to start clipping. I like to have an assistant come out and feed the donkey little bits of carrot or apple or blades of grass while I am doing the clipping. This usually keeps my donkeys happy and still for quite a while, while I am clipping them.

Be sure to follow the directions in your clipper manual to properly clean, oil, and prepare your blades before you start using them. This will help them operate better and last longer.

If you have a more experienced donkey who has no concerns about the clippers, you may want to start with clipping his legs first, then his head and face, and finally his neck and back. This is because the donkeys tend to get board after a while, and don't stand as still, making it harder to clip the legs and face.

With donkeys that I have not clipped many times before, I usually start with the shoulder or back. That is because the donkey is usually more accepting of the strange clippers touching him in those areas than on his sensitive legs and face. I always clip against the direction the hair grows, and this gives me the smoothest clip.

For most of the body clipping I use a #3F clipper blade to give a nice smooth coat, but not so short that the skin shows through.

I usually start right above the tail, and clip a long path up the donkey's back. It is important to have sharp clipper blades, and just let the clippers glide through the hair - sort of like a hot knife gliding through butter. Don't try to force the clippers through the hair. That will only slow the clipper blades down, overheat your clipper motor, and pack too much hair into the blade at once. Clip a few inches, then flick your wrist away to toss the loose hair out of the way, and continue clipping along your path, repeating this process.

As you are clipping, listen to your clipper motor, you will hear it run nice and fast when you first start. As you are clipping, you will hear it start to slow down some. Every little bit you will need to spray your blade with blade coolant spray to keep the blade cool and moving fast. As you work, the blade will start getting warm. After a while you will probably need to let that blade cool for a while. This is where it is handy if you have several #3F blades, so you can just take off the hot blade and put in a fresh one to use while the first one is cooling down.

If you are clipping a big donkey like mine, you may also need to stop once or twice in the middle to clean your blades in blade wash and then re-oil and spray them with blade coolant before going back to clipping again. This process will wash a lot of the hair pieces and dust particles out of the blade and help it run better again, too.

Once I have the first path clipped along my donkey's back, I continue by clipping strip by strip along side the first path, making it wider. I continue this moving down the donkey's side. Always pay attention to the direction the hair grows. Somewhere early on you will have to switch to an angle going up instead of across. The hair directly on top of the donkey's back grows straight back, but the hair on the side of his hip grows back and down at an angle, and the hair on his sides grows almost vertically down. Follow the angle of hair growth clipping against the grain to maintain the smoothest clip.

Once you have finished one side of his body, clip the other side. Then you can clip his tummy fur, clipping against the direction it grows. If your donkey is still standing patiently, and not too board yet, you can clip the fur on the sides of his neck next. Don't clip his mane yet. We'll do that later.

With my big mammoth donkeys, I am usually tired of clipping by this point, and my donkey is starting to get tired of it too, so I usually stop and clean up for that day, saving the rest for another session.

I don't have any good pictures right now of the steps we covered today, but I will be clipping several of my show donkeys in the next few days, and will get some to post then.

Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 07:47 AM | Comments (2)

April 15, 2005

Throcky's Webcam

Do you like watching other people's donkey webcams as much as I do? I find it pretty addicting sometimes!

You may have noticed we recently added a new donkey webcam to the list of webcams on the menu up above. The new one is Throcky's Web Camera. Throcky is a special miniature donkey who's owner is also the moderator of the Donkey-Mule-Photo email list on YahooGroups.

Throcky is famous as the miniature donkey who gives weight loss advice. He also likes to makes trips with his owner to McDonalds for snacks, and loves going to parties, too.

Take a few minutes to stroll on over and visit Throcky and his friends on their webcam at http://webcam.throcky.com . Click on the "enlarge" link under the little webcam picture at the top of the screen to view it in a larger window.

You might like to also visit Throcky's website at http://www.throcky.com and learn more about this distinguished donkey.


Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 07:03 PM | Comments (0)

April 14, 2005

Treat of the Week - Fruit Stacks

Here is something to start your critters' mouths watering!

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Fruit Stacks

Select several of your favorite longears-edible fruits. Here are some ideas:

Apples
Oranges
Carrots
Celery
Strawberries
Pears

Wash the fruits and slice them in thin slices. Then stack the slices together to make small fruit stacks. In this picture I used apples and oranges. Be creative, and have fun! I'm sure your longeared buddies will enjoy the gourmet appetizers before their grass hay dinner.

Here is what my taste-test team thought - "More, Please??"

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Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 10:31 PM | Comments (0)

April 13, 2005

Entries Are Due

I don't know about you, but I am eagerly anticipating Bishop Mule Days!

If you are planning to attend and want to compete in any of the events, you only have a few more days left to get your entries faxed in. The pre-entry deadline is April 15 (this Friday), and the post entry deadline is in the office by May 2, 2005.

This year Bishop Mule Days is going to be 6 days filled with many different mule and donkey events

From Western Pleasure to Pack Scrambles...

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...Dressage to Donkey Driving...

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...Or maybe just hanging out with friends...

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...Bishop Mule Days is a longears lovers' dream vacation! There are only 6 weeks left 'til the show will be in full swing. If you will be at Mule Days, we'd love to meet you while you're there!


Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 07:04 AM | Comments (0)

April 12, 2005

Scam Alert

There are a number of Internet buying scams that are circulating around. I think it's time to remind everyone again that they need to watch out for these kind of offers.

Some of you have probably heard about the scammers on the Internet who offer to buy equines, tack & other expensive equipment with a cashiers check and odd arrangements. But for those of you who have not, here is some good information to be aware of.

If you receive an email like the one below, please delete it. Most often these "buyers" ask to send you a *fake* certified check or money order for an amount that is quite a bit more than the amount you are asking for the things they want to buy. Then they want you to send them (or someone else) a refund for the overpayment.

Here is an example of one such email that has been going around recently:


Good day,

Im Fredrick Herbert. There is a request for Three of our Mules by a Dr. Joe Maxwell from ID. He is presently on a vacation to Africa with his family, and shortly he will be back here in the states.

Unfortunately, we have got only Two and iam hoping i could get the Third one from you. I got your ads from the webpage "www.longearsmall.com and i am very interested in purchasing the Third Mule from you.

I would need your PAYMENT INFORMATION ie.
NAME YOU WANT ON THE BANK CHECK/MONEY ORDER ???
ADDRESS YOU WANT IT MAILED TO ???
and PHONE# ???

I will intruct him to send the funds in your name, ie. your money together with mine as i will be out of town for my father's funeral arrangement and will not be able to collect and handle it until i am back.

Looking forward to doing business with you.

Regards.
*NB
Attache any Available Pics for me to view.


It is a good practice to be sure you do your homework when buying or selling your donkeys and mules. Find out about the person you are buying from or selling to, their equine experience and resources, and what they hope to do with the animals they're buying. Most buyers and sellers are good honest people and are happy to talk with you and answer your questions, but if their story sounds fishy like this scammer, please be careful!


Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 09:41 PM | Comments (0)

April 11, 2005

Clipping Your Donkey for Show - Part 3

Once you have followed the steps in last weeks article in this series, your donkey should be pretty clean and his coat should be ready to clip.

Now you have to get your donkey used to your electric clippers before you can really start clipping that winder fur away. Also if your weather is like ours this time of year, you'll want to make sure you have some other means for keeping him warm at night before you take all his warm furry coat away. I have two kinds of blankets I have bought for this purpose. One is an insolated waterproof blanket that sheds the rain and snow well if the weather turns bad. Mine are WeatherBeeta brand and are one of their medium weight waterproof insolated turnout blankets

Here are Sagebrush Oklahoma Andy, Sagebrush Desert Desire, and Sagebrush Lady Elvira modeling their Weatherbeeta blankets. Lady Elvira's blanket was a little too long on her, and I need to stitch the back up above her withers so that the part around her chest stays up higher. But the other two donkeys' blankets fit pretty well.

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My other kind of blankets are an inexpensive heavy blanket. They have cotton duck canvas on the outside and a wool lining. I was able to purchase them for around $30 or so at my local tack store. If the weather is rainy or wet, I put the more expensive waterproof blankets on the donkeys. But if it's just cold and dry, I put the duck canvas blankets on. That way my expensive blankets are not as likely to get worn out and torn up as fast.

If you are going to blanket your donkey, it is also very important to keep track of the temperature where they are, and take the blankets off when it starts getting too warm. You don't want your donkeys to overheat when the sun comes up and warms things up! So always be very careful to watch out for your donkeys' comfort when using blankets. This is one reason I usually only clip the donkeys I am taking to show, and I try to wait until as late as I can to do their clipping.

Once you are prepared to keep your donkeys warm once you remove their natural coat, you are ready to start introducing them to your electric clippers.

Your clippers are an electrical tool, and before you start using them outside, please make sure they are plugged into a ground fault circuit interrupter so that you and your donkeys will be protected from hazardous electrical shocks. I have several of little units with the brand name Shock Buster. They can come in handy in a lot of places! I purchased mine at Lowes.

Now, tie your donkey up in a safe place or have an assistant hold your donkey's lead rope. Stand about 30 feet away from your donkey and turn the clippers on. Let your donkey listen to their noise for a few seconds, then turn them off and give your donkey a treat and lots of praise. As your donkey is comfortable, slowly move closer with the running clippers. If your donkey gets really scared or nervous about the sound, back off and let him listen to them from a distance for a while longer.

Eventually your donkey should stand pretty quietly while you approach him with the running clippers. I usually leave the clippers running while I'm stepping closer, so that they don't startle my donkey when I turn them on, until he is used to their sound and has relaxed some. In my experience it usually only takes a few minutes of this before I can slowly walk up to my donkey with the clippers running in one hand, and pet him and feed him a treat with the other hand.


Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 09:39 PM | Comments (0)

April 08, 2005

Funny Faces

Anyone who says a donkey doesn't have a sense of humor, doesn't know a donkey!

Here are some of my donkeys' funny faces that I have been lucky enough to catch on digital "film".

Sagebrush Oklahoma Andy saying...
"You gonna come talk to me?"
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"Ahh... That feels soooo good!"
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"More please?"
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Sagebrush Desert Delight saying...
"Do I really have to have a bath today? I promise, I tried to not get too dirty when I rolled in that dusty spot!"
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Sagebrush Lady Elvira saying...
"Look at me!!! I can see you. Won't you please come play?"
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Sagebrush Desert Delight demonstrating the donkey Hoover Vacc. Look at the look in her eye - "Ah this watermelon tastes soooo good on a hot summer day!"
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Sagebrush Oklahoma Andy - "I love playtime! What new trick can we do today?"
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And Sagebrush Lady Elvira (aka Elsie) with a priceless expression!
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Seriously though, this one isn't hard to catch on her face. Every time Elsie gets a drink of water, she likes to stop in the middle and play with a mouth full of water for a while, swishing it around in her mouth like a little child. And her tongue is always hanging out when she does it!

Aren't donkeys just great!


Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 06:32 AM | Comments (0)

April 07, 2005

Treat of the Week - Andy's Apple Pie

Apple pie is one of my favorite desserts. Here is a recipe for apple pie that you can share with your donkeys and mules, too!

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Andy's Apple Pie

Pie Crust:
1 cup Rolled Oats
2 cups Hot Tap Water
Salt to taste (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix piecrust ingredients together. Press crust dough into oiled pie pan. Bake for 15-20 minutes or until it is crisp.


Pie Filling:
1 cup Apple Juice Concentrate
4 cups Water
2-3 Large Apples

Mix Apple Juice Concentrate and water together in a saucepan. Slice the apples in thin slices and add them to the juice. Cover and cook on the stove until the apple slices are soft and cooked. Add more water if necessary, to replace water that evaporates while cooking.

Mix the following in another container and set aside:
1/3 cup Cornstarch
2/3 cup Cold Water

Once the apples are soft and finished cooking (and is heated to a slow boil), remove the saucepan from the stove. Stir the cornstarch mix again to make sure the cornstarch is well mixed with the water and ready to pour. Then quickly stir it in to the cooked apple and juice mix before the juice has a chance to cool. The hot (boiling temperature) juice will cook the cornstarch and thicken the pie filling mix. Stir together until the evenly mixed.

Then pour the pie filling into your crust, and set the pie aside to cool and congeal. Just before serving, decorate the top with fresh apple slivers.

Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 10:40 PM | Comments (0)

April 06, 2005

What's New?

I wanted to take this chance to thank all of you who have sent us comments and suggestions for the Longears Mall website. Your feedback and ideas are greatly appreciated!

You may have noticed that I recently made a few changes to our home pages. One of those changes is the Stores and Classifieds category list down the left side of the screen.

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Now you can easily access any category of your choice under either the Stores Directory or Classified Ads sections of our website directly from our home page. Simply click the desired category links and you will be taken right there! There are many great businesses and service providers listed in the Stores section of our website, and quite a few nice mules and donkeys for sale in our Classifieds. When I have free time, I enjoy browsing through all the great resources, and taking a tour of discovery checking out all the new donkey and mule websites!

If you have a donkey, mule, or equine business that you think other longears owners might be interested in, we invite you to consider listing your business in our Stores/Business Directory.

You are also welcome to list any individual donkeys, mules or tack that you have for sale in our Classified Ads section. If you need any assistance posting your Classified Ad or Business Listing, please email me and I will be happy to help you.

And if you think of any new features that you would like to see added to the Longears Mall, we'd love to hear from you! Just send us a note!

Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 07:10 AM | Comments (0)

April 05, 2005

Side-Saddle Mules

It's not to often that you see a mule or donkey being ridden side-saddle now days.

But at Bishop Mule Days there are still a few who come to compete in the Side-Saddle Pleasure Mule class. Here are several pictures from that class last summer. I believe the lady in the red and black outfit was riding a Western style side saddle, and the other lady was riding a Hunter or English style side-saddle.

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I have not tried riding side-saddle yet, but I would love to try it someday! It is a fascinating part of our equestrian history!

If you are interested in learning more about side-saddle riding, here are a few great links for you.

The Side Saddle Association - Check out the photo on their Enquiry page with the lady riding her horse over jumps in a side-saddle!
International Side Saddle Organization - They have more great photos.
A great article from NewRider.com about Side-Saddles and Side-Saddle riding.
The Side Saddle Lady Museum, and the history of Side-Saddle Riding
Side Saddle Australia

Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 10:35 PM | Comments (0)

April 04, 2005

Clipping Your Donkey for Show - Part 2

So do you have all of your clipper parts and blades yet? Now you can start getting your donkey ready to clip.

Before you start clipping your donkey, you will want to clean as much of the dirt and dust out of their fur as possible.

If it's a warm sunny day, you can hose them off or wash them with a bucket if water and a scrubber. I like to use luke warn (but not hot) water to bathe them. I was able to find a hose adapter, at my local hardware store, that allows you to connect a garden hose to a sink faucet. Then I turn the faucet on and wait for the water temperature at the other end of the hose to stabilize. Just be very careful to make sure that the water is not too hot!

I have an assistant hold the donkey's lead rope while I slowly run water over the donkey's sides, back, legs, and neck. I don't usually try to wash their head or ears. Most of the donkeys I have worked with didn't really like the idea of the hose at first, but once they were wet and felt the warm water washing through their fur, they didn't fuss too much.

I do have one donkey that doesn't like me running the hose near him. I usually fill a bucket with warm water, and use a smaller scoop to scoop the water out and gently pour it on whatever part of the donkey I want to wash. Just take your time, and soon your donkey will decide that it's not so bad having the comfortably warm water running through his fur.

Here is a picture of Sagebrush Desert Delight getting a bath before her spring clipping session:

Bath01.jpg

Once your donkey is all wet, you can soap him up with an equine shampoo. Next be sure to thoroughly rinse him off with water. You don't want to leave any of that soap where it can irritate his skin. Then tie your donkey up where he can stand and dry without getting dirty.

If it is too cold or breezy to give your donkeys a bath, you can also brush them really good first before you clip them. Some people also us a Shop-Vac to vacuum the dirt out of their fur, but here in Utah the air is so dry that that creates static electricity in their fur, so I don't use the vacuum. The more dirt you can get out, the less there will be left in their fur to dull your blades.

By the way, if you have old blades that need to be sharpened, check out Frank Rowe & Son. They have a mail-in clipper blade sharpening service. I had them sharpen my clipper blades this last winter, at the recommendation of another donkey breeder. They did a really nice job with my blades, and had a fast turn around time.

Next time we'll continue our discussion of the steps for clipping your donkeys.

Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 08:52 PM | Comments (0)

April 01, 2005

What's on the Calendar?

It looks like this spring and summer are going to be a busy time of year!

KristieJorgensen.jpgThere are a lot of shows, rides, clinics, sales and other longears events scheduled for the coming months. I just added over 40 new events to our Longears Mall event calendar!

So as you are planning your summer, we invite you to browse through our calendar and see if there are any events of interest to you.

Just click on the calendar link on the menu above to view the calendar and start exploring through all the upcoming events. You will notice that the entries come in a number of colors for different types of events.

Color: Shows Rides Clinics Non-USA Sales

I am sure there are a lot of donkey and mule events that will continue to be added to the Longears Mall calendar through the coming months, so check back often for event updates. Continue sending in your events to orders@longearsmall.com and I will add them.

Speaking of upcoming events, it looks like Columbia Tennessee Mule Days is taking place this weekend in Columbia Tennessee. I hear that it is quite an exciting show! Are there any of you going who would like to share with us your adventures?

Kristie Jorgensen
LongearsMall.com


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Posted by Kristie Jorgensen at 06:39 AM | Comments (0)